honors-and-memorials

Godwin, Thurman and Beatrice

Thurman and Beatrice Rae Godwin
In Memory Of
Thurman Godwin Beatrice Rae Godwin
May 20, 1916 - February 27, 1984 Apri12, 1920 - July 13, 1989

 

Thurman Godwin and Beatrice Rae Holland both grew up in the Glendale community and established their home there when they married on November 11, 1938, in Kenly. They farmed fifty acres of land, growing tobacco, corn, beans, and cotton, at times. Like other farmers in the Kenly area, they worked long hours alongside relatives and neighbors during decades of change in the south's agricultural practices. They killed hogs every winter, preserving the pork in the smokehouse and freezer, and they also raised chickens and cows. Beatrice Rae dressed chickens at home and sold eggs as well as home-churned butter to people in the community. Of course, their garden was a large one, offering plenty of vegetables for eating, canning or freezing, and sharing. Surrounding the home, they planted grapes, peaches, apples, figs, and blueberries — no lack of fruit for preserves, jellies, jacks, and pies.


On Sundays, Thurman and Beatrice Rae, along with their children Roy, Sandra, Betty, and Rebecca, attended Center Ridge Presbyterian Church, where Thurman served as treasurer for many years and where Beatrice Rae often taught the adult Sunday School class. In her later years, Beatrice Rae found enjoyment in teaching herself to play the piano and in writing poetry. Her poem "Sighs of an Abandoned House," cited below, was published in The Smithfield Herald in 1982. Thurman died on February 27, 1984, and Beatrice Rae died on July 13, 1989. Both are buried at Center Ridge Church.


"Sighs of an Abandoned House"
Where have all my people gone? No more laughter, no more glee; All my rooms are empty now--Only memories and me.
Briars and brambles entwine me, There's a bareness on my walls; Windows broken through acts of violence,
And thieves parade my halls.
As each day ends and night
approaches,
I begin to sigh:
Another night of loneliness--Where have all my people gone?


Memorial contributions by Roy S. Godwin, Sandra G. Ferrell, Betty G. Wiggs, & Rebecca G. Smith.

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